Paperclip Robot Blog

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Mar 8

Busycal bug makes turns one-day events into two-day events

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I’m a Mac user who used to run my life with the Palm Desktop application along with my old Palm Pilots and Treo phones (before the iPhone came out). Once I moved to my first iPhone, I never felt like stock Mac Calendar apps (iCal) could do everything I wanted with to-dos and calendar events. So I augmented my workflow to make it work using Apple’s Calendar apps on Mac and iPhone/iPad.

After hearing a lot of recommendations, I finally tried BusyCal on my Mac a couple of years ago, and felt it was like the regular Apple Calendar application on steroids. It operates pretty much like the regular calendar app (not much to learn), but BusyCal simply makes a lot of things easier and more intuitive, allowing for things link selecting and dragging multiple events to new dates/times on the calendar.

The Problem: For the past week or so, I noticed that dragging all-day events to new dates would sometimes result in them becoming two-day events. Even worse, I couldn’t manually change the end date to be the same as the first date, because the app immediately changed the date back to occupy two days.

The Reason? Turns out, any all-day even you move to the Saturday before Daylight Saving Time spills into the following Sunday, due to the way BusyCal calculates the lost hour on Sunday morning.

The simple fix? Just uncheck the “all-day” box and the check it again, and then the weird two-day event becomes a normal one-day event.

If anyone else in the world has experienced this odd problem, hopefully this post will help you deal with and understand it. I originally thought there was a bigger issue with BusyCal, until BusyMac support figured out it was likely due to Daylight Saving Time.

Feb 5

PASSWORDS FOR PASSWORD MANAGERS

Nowadays, if you keep up on computer security news, you know you should use a different password on every website you access, especially for important websites. Why? Because websites, banks, and other entities get compromised, and hackers often are able to steal tens of thousands of passwords at a time. If your password gets stolen, then it’s easy to understand why you are better off using a unique password for every website you access.

Of course, you need to use strong passwords on every website, which means using passwords that are long and very random (making it hard to remember dozens of them). That’s why many people have turned to password managers to keep track of all their complex passwords. You enter one master password, and the password manager gives you access to all your passwords, and possibly other important information you choose to keep there.

What I don’t hear emphasized enough is that it is extremely important to use a very strong password for your password manager’s master password. Not just for the obvious reason—that figuring out this one password is all it would take for a hacker to have access to all of your passwords, and all of the other important info you may keep there—but also because, once anyone has the encrypted password data, they can use a computer to submit billions of passwords per minute, until they “crack” your master password. Hackers have learned from all the passwords they’ve stolen, which are the most common, and also from common tricks that people use. So putting a zero for the letter “O” or a one for the letter “L”, and other substitution tricks like typing the line above on the keyboard, don’t do much to slow down a hacker from cracking your password. They start with the most common million passwords, and then move on to trickier and trickier passwords. Don’t give them a simple one.

You may think your password manager is on your computer, and wonder how a hacker gets hold of your encrypted password data in the first place. There are many ways. Maybe you’re logged into a public Wi-Fi spot, and a clever hacker is able to access your encrypted data through one of many exploits. Or maybe your computer gets stolen. Maybe your computer’s backup disk gets stolen. Maybe your data is on Dropbox, or some other cloud backup, where it can be grabbed by some exploit a hacker has figured out. Maybe your data is still on an old computer hard drive that you thought you’d erased, but it wasn’t erased well enough to stop someone from recovering your information. Or maybe a hacker can grab your data through a yet-to-be-publicized vulnerability in your web browser, JAVA, your router, your computer’s operating system, etc. Just recently it’s become clear that many home routers have sloppy UPnP (Universal Plug N Play) programming, that allows any hacker to get into your home network from anywhere on the Internet.

So please, figure out an amazingly good password for your password manager, from day one. A good password is long, it is very random, and it contains a mix of uppercase letters, lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols. Of course, you have to be able to remember it. Here are two sites that I think are helpful in figuring out a strong password. But please be careful if you use an online site to test your password’s strength. I would test a password that is similar in complexity, but not the actual password you use (or intend to use):
http://strongpasswordgenerator.com
https://www.grc.com/haystack.htm

An example of a password I think is memorable, yet very difficult to crack, is: BIGbifff+1212is,DUM,dum

 

Okay, I can’t help it; I have to add a few more security tips in this post, aside from the password manager tip:

1) Use very strong passwords for every email account. If a bad guy can get onto your email account, he can ask for websites to reset their passwords, in which case new passwords are sent to your email address.

2) Look for an HTTPS connection whenever you are on a website asking for valuable data (password, credit card, social security number, etc.).

3) Avoid using public Wi-Fi when possible, especially any Wi-Fi that doesn’t need a password to get onto.

4) Make sure all your web browsers have JAVA turned off (“JavaScript” can be on).

5) Keep your computer operating system, web browsers, and popular plug-ins (Flash, JAVA, etc.) up to date; don’t put off security updates.

6) Don’t use any password manager that hasn’t been thoroughly reviewed and recommended.

Bottom line is, hackers break into governments and banks when they want to, so they could get your data if they decided they wanted to. Let’s hope they don’t. But at the very least, try to keep everything safe from the hacker-bots and novice hackers.

 

COMMON PASSWORDS

The most common passwords of 2012:

1. password

2. 123456

3. 12345678

4. abc123

5. qwerty

6. monkey

7. letmein

8. dragon

9. 111111

10. baseball

11. iloveyou 

12. trustno1

13. 1234567 

14. sunshine 

15. master 

16. 123123

17. welcome 

18. shadow

19. ashley 

20. football

21. jesus

22. michael

23. ninja

24. mustang

25. password1

2012 Popular Password Source: SplashData

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Delete iPhone email dated 1969

Are you being driven crazy by blank emails on your iPhone (and iPad?) dated 1969? It’s quite easy to fix the problem.

  1. Open your Mail app
  2. Press the home button to go to the home screen
  3. Double-click the home button
  4. Press and hold the Mail icon at the bottom until it wiggles
  5. Press the minus (-) sign (make the Mail app quit)
  6. Be happy to see your 1969 messages are gone!

Resetting your iDevice will also fix the problem, since this also make the Mail app quit.

Nov 9

Customize your iPad Kiosk with Branded BubCaps

Custom branded bubcaps

Corporate IT professionals deploying iPads as menus, kiosks, or intake devices, often don’t want to encumber the devices with bulky (and expensive) enclosures. But they also want to keep the home button covered, as patrons are supposed to stay in a specified app. BubCap home button covers help make it clear that the home button is not intended to be pushed. This clearly signals to patrons that they interacting with a specific-use device (not an iPad to goof around with). Even with software options to lock users into an app, many business wish to make it clear that patrons are not intended to play with the home button, or the device in general.

We can manufacture custom BubCaps with your company’s logo, so even when the iPad screen is turned off, your iPad doesn’t stop showing off your brand’s identity. Cost per unit is relatively inexpensive with larger quantities, which makes custom BubCaps a great option for large public iPad deployments. We can even create a custom shape to match your logo artwork, for a very branded iPad experience.

Please contact us to learn more about unbranded as well as custom branded BubCaps.

BubCaps recommended in The New York Times (print edition)!

Don’t get us wrong, we were thrilled when BubCaps were covered on the official   NYTimes.com website back in January of this year. But there’s something about being recommended in the print version of The New York Times that feels pretty exciting. Perhaps it’s a bit easier to brag about this to older relatives (the one’s who don’t have a clue what it means to be awarded “TUAW Best iPad Accessory of 2011”). Thanks to Somini Sengupta and Jeana Lee Tahnk for including BubCaps in this article!

For toddlers and young children, BubCap covers the “home” button of smartphones and tablets, a bit like a childproof bottle top. 

BubCaps recommended in The New York Times!

Delete photos on iPhone

This morning I realized I had a ton of photos and videos on my iPhone that should have been deleted. Searching for ways to bulk delete, I came across this very helpful tip on Apple’s support message boards, for how to quickly delete photos (some or all) from an iPhone, iPad, or just about any photo-taking device. Thanks “ziishan”!


FOR MAC

  1. connect your iDevice
  2. open preview
  3. select File > Import from (your iDevice name)
  4. then select the photos you want to delete (or “select all”) and choose the red circular symbol at the bottom

FOR WINDOWS

  1. connect iDevice
  2. open My Computer
  3. find your connected iDevice and open it
  4. go through to view all pics and vids
  5. select the pics you want to delete (or “select all”) and then delete.


Adobe CS doesn’t support Lion’s “Restore windows…”
This isn’t our typical BubCap post, but hope that’s okay. We do all are out graphics here at Paperclip Robot, and we rely on Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, whic are both part of Adobe’s CS 5.5. Our CS 5.5 suite was running smoothly until we updated our Macs to Lion, then we found Illustrator and Photoshop froze several times a day on our Mac Pro. After a round or two with Adobe online support, we were told something interesting.

Hello Paperclip Robot, Adobe software currently doesn’t support the automatic restore feature of Mac Lion, if deleting the Cache did resolve the issue in a short time probably it reocurred because the cache have been recreated. Please delete the user cache and pref files again and disable “Restore windows when quitting and re-opening apps) in System Preferences>GeneralThanks! Adobe Tech Support

Do all Adobe CS users know they have to turn off the automatic window restore option if they are using Lion? We sure didn’t, hope this post helps someone!
[Disclosure: The actual Adobe response was a bit more vague, and seemed to be written by someone who spoke something other than English as a native language, so we edited their response a bit to improve the quality of the direction]

Adobe CS doesn’t support Lion’s “Restore windows…”

This isn’t our typical BubCap post, but hope that’s okay. We do all are out graphics here at Paperclip Robot, and we rely on Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, whic are both part of Adobe’s CS 5.5. Our CS 5.5 suite was running smoothly until we updated our Macs to Lion, then we found Illustrator and Photoshop froze several times a day on our Mac Pro. After a round or two with Adobe online support, we were told something interesting.

Hello Paperclip Robot, 

Adobe software currently doesn’t support the automatic restore feature of Mac Lion, if deleting the Cache did resolve the issue in a short time probably it reocurred because the cache have been recreated. Please delete the user cache and pref files again and disable “Restore windows when quitting and re-opening apps) in System Preferences>General

Thanks! 

Adobe Tech Support

Do all Adobe CS users know they have to turn off the automatic window restore option if they are using Lion? We sure didn’t, hope this post helps someone!

[Disclosure: The actual Adobe response was a bit more vague, and seemed to be written by someone who spoke something other than English as a native language, so we edited their response a bit to improve the quality of the direction]

Big News in iOS 6 - Our take on Single-app mode

Since January 2011, BubCap home button covers have helped keep toddlers, kids, and adults in apps on iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. BubCaps have been adopted by parents, special needs classroom, and businesses publicly deploying iPads as kiosks, menus, and intake devices.

With iOS 6 and Guided Access, Apple adds a software lock called Single-app mode. This long desired feature will be welcomed by those able to use iOS 6 on their devices, and who need to keep iDevice users from switching out of apps.

People and businesses with the Original iPad (or iPad 1), and others who are not able to update to iOS 6, don’t fear, BubCaps can economically bring similar capabilities to your device. BubCaps come in both semi-rigid models (great for younger kids and in many special needs environments) and also rigid aluminum models (great for businesses and also older kids with special needs).

BubCaps are also a great compliment to Single-app mode on an iPad menu or kiosk – don’t just disable the home button, keep it sealed, clean, and clearly off limits to patrons. If you want users to know they are interacting with a single-use device (not a tablet to play with), make it clear by covering the home button with a BubCap! And for to brand your kiosk or iPad menu, order custom BubCap home button covers with your company’s logo. BubCaps are the final touch in publicly deploying your iPad.

OrderBubCapsOnAmazonOrder BubCap on Amazon.com

Jun 5

BubCaps going corporate

Several months ago, we were excited to receive an email from Sarah Merz DeVoll, the President and CEO of FC Organizational Products.

Who is FC Organizational Products? Well, to start with, they are the exclusive consumer products licensee of the Franklin Covey brand, which started in 1984 with the well-known “Franklin Planner” (named after Ben Franklin, who kept his own small book to stay organized). The company opened retail stores in the ’90s, and more recently launched several websites including FranklinPlanner.com and TheOrganizedParent.com. They also have a catalog that is sent to over one million people.

So why did the President and CEO of this prestigous company contact Paperclip Robot? She called to tell us she wanted her company to carry BubCaps! The interesting backstory is, Ms. DeVoll heard several fellow executives complain about how difficult it was to share their iPhones and iPads with their children, because the kids wouldn’t stay in their apps, and would sometimes mess up stuff on these devices. Ms. DeVoll ran across a review of BubCaps on LilliesPad.com, and she decided that her company needed to carry our product! 

With pride, we are able to say almost the entire BubCap line is currently available at the FC Organizational Products websites listed above, and with luck BubCaps will soon be available at Franklin Covey retail stores, nationwide (not to mention their online stores worldwide).

RJ Cooper Logo

RJ Cooper is one of the pioneers of Assistive Technology. Not many were doing it back when RJ started in 1983, and his current customer list includes tens of thousands of people in need of products he sells (many of which he designed).

RJ saw our line of BubCaps, did a lot of extensive testing of various models. RJ came to the conclusion that our BubCap Pro is the best model for special needs environments, and he decided to carry BubCap Pro on his website. And then RJ took the product a step further! In order to make it a bit easier to activate the home button (for teachers, therapists, and parents), RJ customizes all the BubCap Pro home button covers he sells by enlarging the pin hole. This allows the home button to be activated with a writing pen, while the product continues to keep students from pressing the home button with their fingers.

RJ set up an entire page dedicated to BubCaps, and also recorded a short video demonstrating installation, home button activation (with the specially modified BubCap Pro), and removal. Thanks, RJ, for everything!

www.rjcooper.com/bubcap

If I want to remove bub cap how do I do that? will it potentially damage the button on removal?

Anonymous

Hello, you do not have to worry about BubCaps damaging the button or iDevice being used. For our semi-rigid BubCaps (Regular, Max, and Pro), it is fairly easy for an adult to remove with their bare hands, as long as they haven’t just cut their fingernails too short. For our aluminum BubCap Pro, it requires use of a utility blade, so care must be used to avoid injury to the iDevice or person doing the removing.

Here’s a link to a video demonstrating removal of a semi-rigid BubCap:
http://youtu.be/R1Ca8bADL_k

And here’s a link to a video demonstrating removal of an aluminum BubCap Pro:
http://youtu.be/0QWUl1oOb4c

Hope that helps. Feel free to contact us if you have more specific questions or concerns:
http://bubcap.com/contact.html

May 8

BubCaps are now Locals Down Under

The business of “Bub-Capping” the home button on the iPad and iPhone has been going strong in Australia and New Zealand ever since we launched BubCaps. And thanks to Success Worldwide, we now have a dedicated distributor in Australia. So whether you need a pack or a large bulk order of BubCaps, Australians and New Zealanders now have a well-stocked local source of BubCap home button covers!

BUBCAP PRESS LIST

Online Press, Reviews and Recommendations
updated 1/17/13

Rich Demuro named BubCaps as one of his “Best of Favorite Things of 2012”

BubCap is the TUAW.com Best iPad Accessory of 2011!
BubCap is TUAW iPad Accessory of 2011

Parenting.com

Forbes.com

CNET.com

Macworld.com

The New York Times

NewYorkTimes.com

KTLA / Rich Demuro (& national syndicated airings)

TUAW.com

TUAW.com (BubCap Pro)

OutsideOnline.com

Examiner.com

TMCnet.com

lilsugar.com

VancouverSun.com

52Tiger.net

TouchReviews.net

CNET Asia

Babyology.com.au

BabyGizmo.com

Canoe.ca

TribLive.com

Lifehacker.com

TheFind.com

GearDiary.com (1 of 2)

GearDiary.com (2 of 2)

theiPhoneMom.com (1 of 2)

theiPhoneMom.com (2 of 2)

RatedByMom.com

BlogCritics.org

ProVideoCoalition.com (our very first review!)

MommyLovesCoffee.com

MomsGoneGeek.com

John Nack on Adobe

MacUse.ca

TheStir.CafeMom.com

DigitalMomBlog.com

Los Angeles Splash

TechTools4Mom.com

theTfiles.com

ClassBrain.com

MommiesWithCents.com

The Organized Parent

ShotsHurtLessBlog.com

BookOfJoe.com

SeeMomWorkBlog.com

Lil-Miss.com

FourMonkeys4MeReviews.com

NeatGeek.net

TouchProducer.com

FiveFreeApps.com

ChipChicklets.com

SimpleFavorites.blogspot.com

Mylittleme.com

ChicaLogic.com

TribePlay.com

Gogomongo.com

survival4moms.com

DaddyMojo.net

ImAFullTimeMummy.com

RealArmyOfMoms.com

WellConnectedMom.com

iKidApps.com

TechTalkForMoms.com

GeekInHeels.com

iHeart-Motherhood.blogspot.com

TheirWordsTheirWay.blogspot.com

DesertMommas.wordpress.com

TheGamerWithKids.com

innomom.com

BirminghamMommy.com

The-Gadgeteer.com

macgasm.net

ShinyShiny.tv

ArtOfTheiPhone.com

ParentingInTheLoop

TheClothspring.com

SlapThePenguin.com

Hawaii Blog

Eric Shepherd’s Blog

That Wife

Letter from Alyssa Milano

OhioBar.wordpress.com

Educational & Assistive-Technology Recommendations

EricSailers.com

Jeremy Legaspi, Pediatric SLP

OT’s with Apps

Scholastic.com

Kim Scharoff SLP

AutismLearningFelt.com

Cindy L. Meester’s Blog

Akron Children’s Hospital

Teacher Share

Spectronics (Australia & New Zealand’s largest special needs technologies supplier)

BridgingApps.org

BroxtermansBlog.blogspot.com

Assistive Technology 4 Education

SueLarkey.com

iPadUserGroup.ca

BehaviorExchange

TCEA.org (Course name has BubCaps in the title!)

AutismEpicenter.com

Lillie’s Pad

Accessible Technology Coalition

iTaalk Autism Foundation

AssistiveWare.com

Conn SENSE Bulletin

TapSpeak.com

Speech Therapy For Autism

Teaching All Students

I Education Apps Review

Lakeside Center for Autism

TapToTalk AAC/Assistive Tech App

PrAACticalAAC.info

RJCooper.com

The Rhythmic Mind (Music Therapy Blog)

iPad and Special Needs

Assistive Technology & Universal Design for Learning in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

Apps for Life

Resource Link BCE

autismlearningfelt.com

Jeremy’s Assistive Technology Resources

Autism Puzzle Mom

Glenda’s Assistive Technology Information

Northwest Suburban Special Education Organization

TechLearning.com

Sheboygan Falls School District - Assistive Technology Resources

STAR Training - Alabama’s Assistive Technology Resource

SpedApps2

EdReach EdCeptional Podcast - Jeremy Brown, Patrick Black, Deb Truskey & Anne Truger 

iPad Education

Ms. Sue’s OT Room

itouch4specialneeds.pbworks.com

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Audio and Video

Rich DeMuro, syndicated nationally on FOX & ABC TV

7live ABC7 San Francisco Bay Area TV

EdReach EdCeptional Podcast - Jeremy Brown, Patrick Black, Deb Truskey & Anne Truger (39:23)

Today in iOS (18:23)

Greg Fitzsimmons Podcast with Jim Gaffigan (16:40)

The Parent Experiment Podcast with Lynette Carolla (Adam Carolla’s wife), Susanna Brisk, and guest Susan Pinsky (Dr. Drew’s wife)(19:52)

Late Night Parents Video-Cast

Non-English Press

PappasAppar.se (Sweden)

SOSiPhone.com (France)

FlowBlog.de (Germany)

Heise.de (Germany)

apfeltouch.net (Germany)

hiperoriginal.com.br (Brazil)

iPhoneil.net(Israel) 

appsy.co.il (Israel)

100shiki.com (Japan)

japan.internet.com (Japan)

headlines.yahoo.co.jp (Japan)

topics.jp.msn.com (Japan)

olpost.com (Korea)

iPadItalia.com (Italy)

notizie-apple.it (Italy)

MacDigger.ru (Russia)

macdac.ru (Russia)

ipad-pro-deti.blogspot.com (Czech Republic)

idevice.ro (Romania)

Why do you not have white Bubcapse for white iPhones?

Anonymous

We currently offer BubCaps in many varieties, combo packs, and even some white options. But to offer every model in both black and white is a step we have yet to take. But we appreciate you asking, the more people who tell us they need white BubCaps, the sooner we will take that step.

Can i put the bubcap under a screen protector? I have a griffin survivor.

Anonymous

There are different types of screen protectors, so it’s hard to give a blanket statement. Many screen protectors are thin films that cover the entire glass surface of an iPad or iPhone. In this case, you can put a BubCap over the film, but if/when you remove the BubCap, it will likely lift up on the film, and could stretch it. We’ve also heard from most customers that BubCaps work fine with just about all cases, even cases that enclose the home button, like the Griffin Survivor. While most customers will put the BubCaps on the iDevice, and then put the case on over the BubCap, we’ve had a couple of customers tell us they use BubCaps on top of the case button (not something we recommend).